A Guide to Sites, Museums, and Memory

Punch Pond Guadeloupe, France

Punch Pond
Punch Pond, where several former slaves, now free people, pillaged and burned down Pirogue Plantation and dumped all the rum and sugar from the plantation.

According to tradition, this was the location of the dramatic events that occurred on June 24th and 25th, 1849, during the first general elections in the Antilles.

Due to some serious electoral incidents on the island of Marie-Galante, the election results were invalidated for all of Guadeloupe by the French National Assembly. Fifty to one hundred people were killed in skirmishes between security forces and partisans of Schoelcher and Perrinon (Republicans), condemning the fraud. Numerous arrests led to some heavy sentences at the trial which took place in 1850.

While the events were taking place, it is believed that several former slaves, now free people, pillaged and burned down Pirogue Plantation and poured all the rum and sugar from the plantation into the nearby pond. This was followed by three days and nights of festivities.

Punch Pond is part of the Slave Route—Traces of Memory network organized by the Conseil Général of Guadeloupe.


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